THE COULSON GROUP OF COMPANIES

 

FUEL MANAGEMENT STANDARD

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

INTRODUCTION                                                                                                                       

 

SECTION 1       LARGE MEANS OF CONTAINMENT GREATER THAN 450L – TANK VEHICLES

 

SECTION 2       SMALL MEANS OF CONTAINMENT LESS THAN or EQUAL TO 450L – TIDY TANKS

 

SECTION 3       FIXED LOCATION ABOVEGOUND STORAGE TANKS (AST) > 230L

 

SECTION 4       MARINE FACILITIES – WHARVES, DOCKS, FLOATING STRUCTURES, BARGES AND BOATS

 

SECTION 5       INITIAL SPILL RESPONSE FOR COMBUSTIBLE PRODUCTS

 

SECTION 6       MINIMUM SPILL RESPONSE KIT REQUIREMENTS

 

SECTION 7       FUEL TRANSFER - PUMPS

 

SECTION 8       GLOSSARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OCTOBER, 2004

INTRODUCTION

 

This document is intended to provide guidance on acceptable industry practices for managing fuel handling, transportation and storage in rural and remote areas of British Columbia along with industrial sites.  It summarizes requirements of applicable statutes of Canada and British Columbia, industry codes of practice and recommendations relating to environmental protection, health and safety, and fire protection.

 

This document provides general guidance; however, it is not intended to address every type of fuel facility that the Coulson Group of Companies may operate. It is the responsibility of each site manager to implement the statutory requirements for which they are responsible. While this document refers to legislation in effect on the date of publication and proposed legislation, users should always reference legislation for accuracy of legal requirements.

 

To assist the user:

 

(1) terms or phrases that are defined in the Glossary (Section 8).; and,

 

(2) legislated requirements and recommendations are separately highlighted throughout the document as follows:

 

n Denotes statutory requirements of legal documents, such as the BC Fire Code and the Federal Transportation of Dangerous Goods Clear Language Regulations, with text references.

 

q Denotes recommended practices.

 

Nothing in this document should be construed as waiving compliance with any applicable statutory or other legal requirement.

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

 

Raymac Environmental Services Inc acknowledges the support and documentation provided by the Ministry of Transport, British Columbia Ministry of Water Land and Air Protection, BC Forest Service, Office of the BC Fire Commissioners and Streamline Environmental Consulting Ltd.  Excerpts from each of these organizations previous works have been directly quoted in developing this document.  References have been reviewed and are current as of the date of this publication.

 

SECTION 1

LARGE MEANS OF CONTAINMENT GREATER THAN 450L – TANK VEHICLES

This section deals with tank vehicles used as temporary fuelling facilities that are intended to be mobile.

 

1.1             DESIGN

 

Tank Trucks

n       A tank truck that does not meet the current CSA B620-1987/TC306 standard may be certified under a “grandfather clause” or equivalence clause if it meets the intent of the CSA B620 standard.  (TDG (5.15(2)): This certification is valid only until January 1, 2005.  After this date the tank must be disposed of or upgraded to meet the CSA B620-98/TC406 standard.  Only a Certified Transport Canada Inspector can certify the tank under the “grandfather clause”. (TDG)

 

¨      Ensure that all trucks used to transport fuel tanks meet commercial vehicle inspection requirements.

o        Inspection may not be required in some remote locations where the trucks are not used on public roads; however, commitment to inspection is recommended to provide assurance that the trucks meet an industrial standard for safety and performance.

 

Trailers & Semi-Trailers

n       As of January 1, 2003 all large means of containment tanks greater than 450 L must meet UN31A or UN 31B standard for flammable or combustible liquids. And conform to CSA Standards CSA B620, CSA B621 & CSA B622.

 

n       For specified manufactured fuel tanks:

·         A ULC/ORD standard 142.13 Mobile Refueling Tank and a TC Standard 57 Portable tank are acceptable substitutes for transporting flammable liquids or combustible liquids

·         A ULC/ORD standard 142.13 Mobile Refueling Tank may be used until January 1, 2010 only if it was manufactured before January 1, 2003. (ULC)

 

¨      Ensure that all tank trucks, trailers and semi-trailers used to transport fuel tanks meet commercial vehicle inspection requirements.  Note:  Inspection may not be required in some remote locations where the trucks are not used on public roads; however, commitment to inspection is recommended to provide assurance that the trucks meet an industrial standard for safety and performance.

 

1.2              OPERATIONS

 

Spill Control & Secondary Containment

Note:    Spill control, including secondary containment, is not required for tank vehicles where the tank is mounted or built as an integral part of the vehicle including tank trucks, trailers and semi-trailers.

 

n       A fuel storage tank > 230L requires spill control (or secondary containment) when it is removed from a mobile unit and installed in a fixed location. (FC1.2.1.2)

 

¨      Consider additional spill control for all fuel storage and dispensing units (including secondary containment systems) that operate in high-risk areas as determined by risk assessment.

 

Safety Awareness

n       Signs, indicating that the ignition must be turned off and smoking is not permitted while the vehicle is being refueled must be visible to every driver approaching the dispenser. (FC 4.5.8.8)

 

n       Maintain at least one 20-B:C portable fire extinguisher with the tank vehicle (FC 4.11.2.1)

 

n       During loading and unloading bulk fuel from a tank vehicle, measures shall be taken against static electrical charges. (FC 4.11.3.2)

 

n       Ensure fuel storage is physically protected against collisions, including:

·         Moving the tank vehicle (or mobile skid) to a safe location or place a barrier (i.e. a log or equivalent protection) between the traffic area and the tank. (FC 4.5.2.1 & FC 4.11.2.4)

 

n       Tanks must not be filled beyond their safe filling level. (FC 4.5.2.7)

 

n       Metallic or conductive containers used to transfer flammable liquids must be electrically bonded to each other or electrically grounded while their contents are being transferred from one container to the other. (OHSR 5.28)

 

¨      When providing collision protection for fuel storage areas, consider selecting:

o        A site that is easily visible

o        A site that is away from traffic

 

Dispensing

n       A storage tank shall be prevented from being overfilled by providing one or both of the following:

·         continuous supervision of the filling operations by personnel qualified to supervise such operations (FC 4.3.1.8)

·         an overfill protection device that meets the intent of ULC/ORD-C58.15, “Overfill protection  Devices for Flammable Liquid Storage Tanks”.

 

n       Refueling equipment from a tank vehicle is permitted if the following conditions are met:

·         only diesel fuel is dispensed into the fuel tanks (not gasoline)

·         the fuelling is conducted in connections with commercial or industrial operations

 

n       Do not fuel or service equipment within a riparian management area of a stream or wetland, or within 30m of a lakeshore identified in an operational plan, unless (i) the equipment is hand held, or (ii) the fuelling or servicing is required for carrying out fire fighting activities, required to move broken down equipment, or authorized by the district manager.

 

n       Do not use any object or device (i.e. stick or glove) to maintain the flow of fuel, that is not an integral part of the hose nozzle valve assembly. (FC 4.5.8.6.)

 

n       When a hose nozzle valve with a hold-open device is used, a break-away coupling conforming to CAN/ULCS644- M, “Emergency Break-away Fittings for Flammable and Combustible Liquids” shall be provided. (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       Fuel hose length must not exceed 4.5m, or 6m where a retracting system is used. (FC 4.5.5.1.(2)(3) & FC 4.11.3.8)

 

¨      There should be no leaks from the valve or pipe system to the pump. Draw-off valves must be threaded at the discharge end or otherwise designed to provide a liquid-tight connection to the delivery hose.

 

¨      Post all fuel handling procedures.

 

¨      Operators should always stay with the nozzle while refueling.

 

¨      Any delivery hose that has the potential to cause a spill, if it were pulled from the delivery pump or valve, should be fitted with a breakaway valve.

 

¨      Gravity-feed systems are considered high-risk facilities and should be phased out as soon as possible. Additional control measures are strongly recommended to ensure:

o        the bottom-of-tank valve is protected

o        the dispensing hose will not be pulled from the bottom of the tank without a break-away valve

o        additional collision protection is installed to prevent the accidental contact with the tank

o        the tank cannot be overfilled

o        access to the top of the tank meets legal requirements

o        the volumes of fuel are recorded through a meter system.

 

¨      The use of automatic shut-off nozzles is recommended to discourage the use of devices to hold the nozzle valve assembly open while refueling.

 

¨      Use fuel-dispensing pumps according to manufactures’ specifications.

 

¨      Close and lock valves as required.

 

Emergency Response

n       A workplace must have a written emergency plan, appropriate to the hazards of the workplace that addresses the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (OHSR) 5.98 to 5.102.

 

n       Spills of TDG Class 3 – flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial Emergency Program (PEP) telephone 1-800-663-3456). (EMA, Spill Reporting Regulation – see definition of TDG Class 3 flammable liquids in Section 8 Glossary.)

 

n       Ensure that spills are recovered and that contaminated soil is removed or treated. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       All vehicles used to transport fuel must have a spill response plan and spill response kit, capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills, . (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       An employer is responsible for providing, at no cost to the worker, all personal protective equipment required to perform a job as outlined in the OHSR (OHSR 8.2.2).

 

¨      An appropriate sized spill response kit / capability must be maintained at each site or on the vehicle

 

n       Spill response training should be conducted every two years. (OHSR 5.102)

 

 

1.3              TRANSPORTATION

 

Load Security

n       No person shall drive or operate on a highway a vehicle carrying a load unless the load is secured in a manner which ensures that:

·         the load will not escape from the vehicle

·         the load will not shift or sway in a manner that may affect the operation of the vehicle.

(MVA Division 35.03)

Driver of the vehicle transporting dangerous goods must posses a valid certificate of training issued by the employer (TDG 6.2)

 

n       Appropriate placards must be visible on all four sides of any fuel truck or mobile refueling trailer that is > 2000L whether filled or empty. (TDG Part IV)

 

1.4              DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING

 

TDG Documentation

n       TDG documentation (TDG 3.1(1), 3.2(1) & 3.5(1)) is required when transporting more than 2000L of TDG Class 3 – flammable liquid. (See Section 8. – Glossary.) The shipping document must show:

·         document number and date

·         the name, address and signature of the shipper

·         the consignee’s name and address and the carrier’s name

·         fully trained-operator status

·         full description and total volume of dangerous good(s);

·         a 24 hour contact number

·         the type and number of placards, if required. (TDG Part IV)

 

n       When transporting an empty tank, the shipping document must use the words: “Residue – Last Contained”.

·         Tanks that are cleaned and purged do not require any documentation. (TDG 3.5(4))

 

Inspection

n       All sites that require cleanup of contaminated soil must follow the WMA, Contaminated Sites Regulation.

 

n       Regular inspections must be conducted and documented to ensure that fuel trucks and mobile refueling tanks meet all safety specifications.

 

¨      Inspections should be documented and inspection reports kept on file.

 

Training and Signage

n       Post clearly legible operating instructions at card or key activated dispensers. (FC 4.5.8.4. & FC 4.5.8.8.)

 

n       Emergency instructions must be conspicuously posted. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       Spill response training should be conducted every two years..(OHSR 5.102)

 

¨      All drivers who transport bulk fuel should be trained through the Canadian Petroleum Producers Institute (CPPI) Drivers Certification Training and Transportation of Dangerous Goods certification course or equivalent.

 

¨      Only experienced drivers with a Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) certificate and emergency response training (ERT) should transport bulk fuel.

 

Waste Management

¨      All waste petroleum products must be gathered in barrels or appropriate means of containment and disposed of by a qualified contractor.  Where possible, drums and pails of waste petroleum products should be stored in an area with appropriate secondary containment and protected from accumulation of rainfall.

 

n       If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79 (OHSR), ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is provided, if applicable. (OHSR 5.7)

 

Return to Table of Contents
 

SECTION 2

SMALL MEANS OF CONTAINMENT LESS THAN or EQUAL TO 450L – TIDY TANKS

 

2.1       DESIGN

See definition of small TDG tank in Section 8. Glossary)

 

n       All small tanks < 450L must be designed, constructed, filled and closed so that, under normal conditions of handling and transport, there will be no discharge, emission or escape of the dangerous goods from the container that could constitute a danger to public safety. (TDG 5.1(2))

 

n       All small TDG tanks must meet the UN31 standard for flammable or combustible liquids.

 

Tanks Used to Transport Diesel Fuel and other Combustible liquids

(Note: For FC and TDG definitions of flammable liquids and combustible liquids, see Section 8.Glossary.)

 

n       Small TDG tanks (< 450L) used for combustible liquids that are constructed to a non-specified standard but meet the intent of TDG Section 5.1(2) (See 2.1 Design above.) will be acceptable. (Note: This remains in the proposed amendment to the TDG Clear Language Regulation.)

 

Tanks Used to Transport Gasoline and other Flammable Liquids

n       Small TDG tanks (< 450L) used for flammable liquids that are constructed to a non-specified standard but meet the intent of TDG Section 5.1(2) (see Design above) may be used until January 1, 2003. Note:

·         a non-specified tank manufactured before 1996 (with visible data plate or date stamp) with a capacity = 450L, that meets the criteria in TDG Section 5.1(2), is a permitted substitute for gasoline fuel until January 1, 2003.

·         a TC57 portable tank is a permitted substitute for gasoline fuel.

·         a ULC/ORD 142.13 specified mobile refueling tank manufactured before January 1, 2003, with a capacity = 450L may be used as a permitted substitute for gasoline until January 1, 2010. (TDG)

 

2.2 OPERATIONS

 

Spill Control & Secondary Containment

Note: Secondary containment is not required for truck-box fuel tanks where the tank is mounted or built as an integral part of the vehicle.

 

 

n       Secondary containment is required for any truck-box fuel tank that is > 230L and removed from the truck, trailer or mobile unit and operated in a fixed location for any length of time. (FC 4.3.7.1.)

 

¨      The degree of spill control should be based on the level of risk.

 

Safety Awareness

n       A truck-box fuel tank must be labeled with a flammable/combustible sticker or placard so that it is visible from outside the truck. (FC 4.2.3.2 & TDG Part 5.1.2)

 

¨      Take appropriate measures against static charge build-up when transferring flammable liquids or combustible liquids in trucks with plastic box liners or rubber mats

 

n       Tanks must not be filled beyond their safe filling level. (FC 4.5.2.7.)

 

n       Any vehicle fitted with a portable fuel tank is required to have at least one 20-B:C rated portable fire extinguisher or two 10-B:C rated portable fire extinguishers are within 9m of the truck-box fuel tank. (FC 4.11.2.1.)

 

¨      Signs, indicating that the ignition must be turned off and smoking is not permitted while the vehicle is being refueled must be visible to every driver approaching the dispenser.

 

¨      Do not fill beyond a safe-filling level corresponding to 90% capacity.

 

Dispensing

n       When dispensing flammable liquids, ensure that static electrical charges are controlled by establishing an electrical connection between the tank or container and truck box fill stem, or by providing other appropriate measures as applicable. (FC 4.1.8.2. FC Appendix A-4.1.8.2.(1)(b))

 

n       Hose nozzle valves must conform to CAN/ULC-S620-M, “Hose Nozzle Valves for Flammable and Combustible Liquids” (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       An automatic shut-off nozzle must be used when using an integral hold-open device. (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       When a hose nozzle valve with a hold-open device is used, a break-away coupling conforming to CAN/ULC-S644-M, “Emergency Break-away Fittings for Flammable and Combustible Liquids” shall be provided.  (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       Do not use any object or device to maintain the flow of fuel that is not an integral part of the hose nozzle valve assembly. (FC 4.5.8.6.)

 

n       Use only manufacturer’s specified pressure relief security caps. (FC 4.2.3.1.)

 

n       Use fuel dispensing pumps conforming to good engineering practice, and designed for flammable or combustible liquids (See Section 6 – Statutes, Industry Standards & Codes of Practice – Office of the Fire Commissioner, Interpretation Bulletin No. IB 016, Pumps for Transferring Flammable or Combustible Liquids.)

 

n       Do not fuel / service equipment within a riparian management area of a stream or wetland, or within 30m of a lakeshore identified in an operational plan, unless (i) the equipment is hand held, or (ii) the fuelling or servicing is required for carrying out fire fighting activities, required to move broken down equipment, or authorized by the district manager.

 

n       Operators should minimize the potential for overfilling a truck-box fuel tank by providing continuously supervised filling operations using suitably qualified personnel. (FC 4.3.1.8)

 

 

¨      Hoses and nozzles used for dispensing fuel should be maintained in good repair.

 

¨      Use nozzles that must be kept open by continuous application of manual pressure.

 

¨      Secure nozzles in the back of pickup trucks with some means of drip containment.

 

¨      Do not use hand pumps where power is available.

 

¨      Ensure that all dispensing procedures are made available to operators.

 

 

Emergency Response

n       A workplace must have a written emergency plan, appropriate to the hazards of the workplace that addresses the requirements of the OHSR 5.98 to 5.102

 

n       Spills of TDG Class 3 – flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial Emergency Program (PEP) telephone 1-800-663-3456). (EMA, Spill Reporting Regulation – see definition of TDG Class 3 flammable liquids in Section 8. Glossary.)  Spills of 200 Litres or more of Class 3 flammable liquids must be reported to Transport Canada if the spill occurs while the means of containment is in transit, or during loading and off loading.

 

n       Ensure that spills are recovered and that all contaminated soil is removed or treated. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       All vehicles transporting fuel must have a spill response kit capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       An employer is responsible for providing, at no cost to the worker, all personal protective equipment required to perform a job as outlined in the OHSR 8.22

 

¨      Provide spill response procedures and a current spill response plan with the vehicle.

 

¨      Maintain a spill response kit, capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills, with the vehicle.

 

 

2.3       TRANSPORTATION

 

Load Security

n       No person shall drive or operate on a highway a vehicle carrying a load unless the load is secured in a manner which ensures that:

·         the load will not escape from the vehicle

·         the load will not shift or sway in a manner that may affect the operation of the vehicle. (MVA Division 35.03)

 

¨      Tanks should be placed on plywood or equivalent material to prevent the tank from rubbing on the truck box platform.

 

2.4 DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING

 

Inspection

n       All sites that require cleanup of contaminated soil must follow the WMA, Contaminated Sites Regulation.

 

¨      Ensure that drips and leaks are routinely cleaned so that the truck box remains clean.

 

Training

¨      TDG training and Spill Response training is recommended for anyone transporting fuel using a truck-box fuel tank.

 

n       Spill response training should be conducted every two years (OHSR 5.102)

 
 

Waste Management

¨      All waste petroleum products must be gathered in barrels or appropriate means of containment and disposed of by a qualified contractor.  Where possible, drums and pails of waste petroleum products should be stored in an area with appropriate secondary containment and protected from accumulation of rainfall.

 

n       If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79 (OHSR), ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is provided, if applicable. (OHSR 5.7)

 

Return to Table of Contents
 

SECTION 3

FIXED LOCATION ABOVEGOUND STORAGE TANKS (AST) > 230L

 

3.1              DESIGN

 

n       All storage tanks for combustible and flammable liquids must be built and maintained in accordance with Underwriters Laboratories of Canada (ULC) tank specifications, and bear a current ULC certification plate or label. (FC 4.3.1.2.)

 

n       Where a storage tank > 230L is removed or abandoned, it is permitted to be reused for the storage of flammable liquids and combustible liquids only after having been refurbished and found to conform to one of the acceptable standards. (FC4.3.1.2 & FC4.10.4.2.)

 

n       Materials, systems, equipment and procedures not specifically described in the Fire Code, or that vary from the specific requirements of the Fire Code, or for which no recognized test procedure has been established, are permitted to be used if it can be shown that these alternatives are equivalent on the basis of tests, evaluations or past performance. (FC 1.1.2.1.)

 

n       All aboveground storage tanks must be installed on firm foundations designed to minimize uneven settling and corrosion, and to prevent the design stress of the tank from being exceeded. (FC 4.3.3.1.)

 

n       Multiple tanks must have a minimum 1m separation between them. (FC 4.3.2.2.)

 

n       Hose Nozzle valves must conform to CAN/ULC-S620-M, “Hose Nozzle Valves for Flammable and Combustible Liquids” (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       When a hose nozzle valve with a hold-open device is used, a breakaway coupling conforming to CAN/ULCS644-M, “Emergency Break-away Fittings for Flammable and Combustible Liquids” shall be provided. (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       Valves at the storage tank must be constructed of steel according to the Fire Code. (FC 4.3.6.2.(1))

 

¨      To ensure a tank meets a specified engineering standard, check for a current certification plate or label.

 

¨      Annual risk assessments should be conducted on all gravity-feed systems currently in operation and control measures implemented to reduce and manage the risk(s).

 

¨      Gravity-feed systems are considered high-risk facilities and should be phased out as soon as possible. Additional control measures are strongly recommended to ensure:

o        the bottom-of-tank valve is protected

o        the dispensing hose will not be pulled from the bottom of the tank without a break-away valve

o        additional collision protection is installed to prevent the accidental contact with the tank,

o        the tank cannot be overfilled

o        access to the top of the tank meets legal safety requirements

o        the volumes of fuel are recorded through a meter system

o        a record of daily inspections and recorded volumes.

 

Temporary-Out-Of-Service

n       Aboveground storage tanks, which will be out of service for a period not exceeding 180 days, must be isolated by closing and securely locking the necessary valves, or by capping the piping from the tank. (FC 4.10.2.2.)

 

n       If the tank contains flammable or combustible liquids, the liquid level in the tank must be measured and the readings compared at intervals not greater than one month. (FC 4.10.2.2.)

 

n       When an aboveground storage tank will be out of service for a period exceeding 180 days:

·         all liquid and vapour must be removed from the tank and its connected piping

·         the tank markings must clearly indicate that the tank is empty. (FC 4.10.2.2.)

 

¨      If the aboveground tank is on a cradle, so that the bottom of the tank is exposed, the bottom of the tank should be visually inspected and documented on a regular basis.

 

¨      Remote facilities, that are difficult or impossible to access on a monthly basis, should secured to prevent spills and contamination. This may include leak detection monitoring equipment with wireless communication alarms.

 

3.2              OPERATIONS

 

Spill Control & Secondary Containment

n       Spill control may include one or more of the following:

·         double-walled tank

·         tank-in-a-box system

·         a graded or sloped site capable of diverting and containing a spill and preventing spills from entering natural waterways, storm drains and sanitary sewers

·         a paved or concrete pad sloped so that water and spilled fuel is directed to an oil/water separator

·         a non-combustible barrier of sufficient height to contain the spill. (FC 4.1.6 & FC 4.3.7.)

 

n       Secondary containment areas must not be used for storage purposes. (FC 4.3.7.9.)

 

n       Tanks within the containment area must be on the ground, mounted on a skid or securely positioned on a cradle. The cradle or tank support shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than 2 hours (i.e. steel). (FC 4.3.3.1.)

 

n       Precipitation must not be allowed to accumulate within the containment area. (FC 4.3.7.8.)

 

 

Safety Awareness

n       Signs, indicating that the ignition must be turned off, smoking is not permitted while the vehicle is being refueled, and any other fuelling procedure, must be visible to every driver approaching the dispenser. (FC 4.5.8.8)

 

n       At least 2 portable 20-B:C rated fire extinguishers must be available within 9m of the work area. (FC 4.6.5.1 & FC 6.2.3.5.)

 

n       Establish proper bonding, grounding and isolation components for protection against static charges during loading of tank vehicles when transferring flammable liquids or combustible liquids. (FC 4.6.4.5.)

 

n       Ensure fuel storage tank is physically protected against collisions. (FC 4.5.2.1.(3))

 

¨      Tanks should be filled to an acceptable safe filling level corresponding to approximately 90% of capacity.
 

Dispensing

n       Fixed dispensers must be protected against collision damage by either:

·         a concrete island not less than 100mm high, or

·         guard rails. (FC 4.5.3.3.)

 

n       Fuel dispensing hose length must not exceed 4.5m, or 6m where a retracting system is used. (FC 4.5.5.1.(2)(3))

 

n       An automatic shut-off nozzle must be used when using an integral hold-open device. (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

n       Do not use any object or device to maintain the flow of fuel that is not an integral part of the hose nozzle valve assembly. (FC 4.5.8.6.)

 

n       There must be no leaks from the valve or pipe system to the pump. Draw-off valves must be threaded at the discharge end or otherwise designed to provide a liquid-tight connection to the delivery hose. (FC 4.4.5.)

 

n       During loading and unloading bulk fuel from a tank vehicle, precautionary measures must be taken to prevent static electrical charges. (FC 4.11.3.2.)

 

¨      Ensure that all operators stay with the fuel nozzle while refueling.

 

¨      Any delivery hose that has the potential to cause a spill, if it were pulled from the delivery pump or valve, should be fitted with a breakaway valve.

 

¨      The fuel dispensing hose should be stored inside the containment berm where applicable.

 

¨      The use of automatic shut-off nozzles with an integrated hold-open device is recommended to discourage the use of devices or objects to hold the nozzle valve assembly open while refueling.

 

¨      The fuel dispensing hose should be stored inside the containment berm where applicable.

 

¨      Keep hoses off the ground and valves closed and locked when not in use.

 

¨      Always stay with fuel dispensing system while refueling.

 

¨      A hose retractor should be used to keep the hose off the ground when not in use.

 

¨      All pumps used to transfer fuel should conform to manufactures' specification.

 

¨      Use automatic shut-off nozzles.

 

¨      Nozzles should be equipped with some means of drip containment.

 

Pollution Prevention

n       Storage tanks must not be overfilled, and precautions must be taken to prevent overflow or spillage by providing continuous supervision of the filling operations by personnel qualified to supervise such operations (FC 4.5.8.6.)

 

¨      To help minimize spills while filling the tank, an over-fill spill box should be located around the fill stem pipe.

 

Emergency Response

n       A workplace must have a written emergency plan, appropriate to the hazards of the workplace that addresses the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (OHSR 5.98 to 5.102)

 

n       A spill response kit capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills must be made available and maintained (FC 4.2.6.3)

 

n       Ensure that spills are recovered and that contaminated soil is removed or treated. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       An employer is responsible for providing, at no cost to the worker, all personal protective equipment required to perform a job as outlined in the OHSR (OHSR 8.2.2)

 

n       Spills of TDG Class 3 – flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial Emergency Program (PEP) telephone 1-800-663-3456). (EMA, Spill Reporting Regulation – see definition of TDG Class 3 flammable liquids in Section 8. Glossary.)

 

¨      Post spill response procedures and maintain an emergency response manual with the fuel facility.

 

3.3 DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING

 

Inspection & Documentation

n       Visual inspections must be made daily and during each shift of the piping system, pumps and ancillary equipment for leaks spills and obvious abnormal conditions. Any leakage must be repaired immediately. (FC 4.4.11.5.)

 

n       At fuel dispensing stations where the tank is resting on the ground (and visual inspection beneath the tank is not possible) the measurement (by tank dip) and computation of any gain or loss of liquid shall be taken each day that the station is in operation. (FC 4.3.16.1.)

 

n       All sites that require cleanup of contaminated soil must follow the WMA, Contaminated Sites Regulation.

 

¨      Keep a record of all volumes before and after deliveries.

 

Training and Signage

n       Ensure that the training of and fuel dispensing attendants includes procedures for:

·         supervising the dispensing of flammable and combustible liquids

·         taking appropriate measures to prevent sources of ignition from creating a hazard at the dispensers

·         taking appropriate action in the event of a spill to reduce the risk of fire

·         shutting off the power to all dispensers in the event of a spill or fire. (FC 4.5.8.5., FC 4.5.8.6. & FC 4.4.11.2)

 

n       Spill response training should be conducted every two years (OHSR 5.102).

 

¨      All drivers who transport bulk fuel should be trained through the Canadian Petroleum Producers Institute (CPPI) Drivers Certification Training and Transportation of Dangerous Goods certification or equivalent.

 

Waste Management

¨      All waste petroleum products must be gathered in barrels or appropriate means of containment and disposed of by a qualified contractor.  Where possible, drums and pails of waste petroleum products should be stored in an area with appropriate secondary containment and protected from accumulation of rainfall.

 

n       If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79 (OHSR), ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is provided, if applicable. (OHSR 5.7)


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SECTION 4

MARINE FACILITIES – wharves, docks, floating structures, barges and boats

 

4.1 DESIGN

 

n       All aboveground storage tanks for combustible and flammable liquids must be built and maintained in accordance with Underwriters Laboratories of Canada (ULC) tank specifications, and bear a current ULC certification plate or label. (FC 4.3.1.2.)

 

n       All aboveground storage tanks must be installed on firm foundations designed to prevent the allowable design stress of the tank from being exceeded, and to minimize corrosion and uneven settling. (FC 4.3.3.1.)

 

n       Refurbished aboveground storage tanks for flammable and combustible liquids must meet the standards specific in the Fire Code before reuse. (FC 4.3.1.2 & FC 4.10.4.2.)

 

n       All fuel facilities around marine facilities require additional control measures as outlined in

·         Marine Fuel dispensing Stations (FC 4.5.6.6)

·         Piers and Wharves. (FC 4.7).

 

¨      Implement the basic industrial standards provided in B. C. Coastal Marine Facility and Operating Standards, Second Edition 1992.

 

¨      Tanks on floating structures should have additional controls including:

·         Additional floatation to ensure buoyancy and stability of the floating structure

·         Additional log-boom protection to ensure protection against large irregular swells and wave action

·         Emergency shut off devices on the tank assembly

·         Pressure relief valves on the tank

·         A baffle system within tank to keep the product within the tank more stable

·         Sheer valves inside the tank

·         Anti-siphon valves for the tank.

 

¨      Fuel dispensing from tanks should be carried out from the tops of the tanks.

 

¨      All gravity-feed systems should be phased-out as a precaution against spills.

 

¨      An annual risk assessment should be conducted on all gravity-feed systems and measures implemented to reduce the risks.

 

Siting Requirements

n       Storage tanks at marine fuel dispensing stations must not be located closer than 4.5m horizontally from the normal annual high-water mark. (FC 4.5.6.6.)

 

n       Solid piping must be used between storage tanks located on shore. Suitable lengths of acceptable flexible hose may be used between piping on floating structure and solid piping located on shore. (FC 4.5.6.6.)

 

n       Where storage tanks at marine fuel dispensing stations are at an elevation above the dispenser, an electrically operated solenoid valves, designed to open only when the dispensing apparatus is being operated, must be provided at the storage tank outlet. (FC4.5.6.6.)

 
 

4.2 OPERATIONS

 

Spill Control & Secondary Containment

n       All fuel storage tanks > 230L capacity require secondary containment. (FC 4.3.7.)

 

n       Spill control must include one or more of the following:

·         double-walled tank

·         tank-in-a-box system

·         a graded or sloped site capable of diverting and containing a spill and preventing spills from entering natural waterways, storm drains and sanitary sewers

·         a paved or concrete pad sloped so that water and spilled fuel is directed to an appropriately designed oil/water separator

·         a non-combustible barrier of sufficient height to contain the spill. (FC 4.1.6 & FC 4.3.7.)

 

n       Secondary containment must be able to contain 110% of the primary tank plus 10% of all the additional containers. Secondary containment must not be used for storage purposes. (FC 4.3.7.3 & FC 4.3.7.9)

 

n       Tanks within the containment area must be on the ground, mounted to a skid or securely positioned on a cradle. The cradle or tank support shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than 2 hours (i.e. steel). (FC 4.3.3.1.)

 

n       Visual inspections must be made daily and during each shift of the piping system, pumps and ancillary equipment for leaks, spills and obvious abnormal conditions. Any leakage must be repaired immediately. (FC 4.4.11.5.)

 

n       Precipitation must not be allowed to accumulate within the containment area. (FC 4.3.7.8.)

 

¨      Safety measures for docks and floating structures should take into account wave action, tidal movement and wind storms, and may include:

o        additional containment (e.g., 150%) with an increased distance between the tank and the wall of the secondary containment (e.g., 1m)

o        floats engineered, designed and constructed to be stable when the fuel tank, and possibly the secondary containment, are at maximum capacity due to water accumulation.

 

¨      Ensure that the secondary containment is kept clean of fuel and oil contamination.

 

Safety Awareness

n       At least 2 portable 20-B:C rated fire extinguishers and one spill response kit must be provided on site. (FC 4.1.5.1.)

 

n       Only trained personnel must be allowed to use the fuel dispensing system. (FC 4.4.11.2.)

 

n       Signs, indicating that the ignition must be turned off and smoking is not permitted while the vehicle is being refueled, must be visible to every driver approaching the dispenser. (FC 4.5.8.8.)

 

¨      Mark each storage tank at a level corresponding to 90% capacity, and do not fill beyond that level.

 

¨      Ensure that clearly marked sign outlining the fuelling procedures is visible to all operators.

 

¨      All personnel on floating structures should use coast guard-approved life jacket/vests.

 

¨      Non-skid surfaces should be used in areas of high traffic and on tidal fluctuating ramps.

 

¨      For docks and floating structures, additional safety measures should be considered to take into account wave action, tidal movement and wind storms. These measures may include:

o        stabilizers under the fuel dock

o        one-way flow valves on all solid lines connecting storage tank to dispensers

o        break-away devices between docks and dock/shore.

 

Dispensing

n       Dispensers at marine fuel dispensing stations shall be at a location which will permit safe access by watercraft. (FC 4.5.2.4.)

 

n       At marine fuel dispensing stations, a readily accessible valve shall be provided in each pipeline at or within 7.5m of the pier to shut off the supply from shore. (FC 4.5.4.3.)

 

n       Tanks and pumps that are not integral with the dispenser shall be located on shore or on a pier of the solid-fill type. (FC 4.5.6.6.)

 

n       Where shore locations would result in excessively long supply lines to the dispenser, storage tanks to a maximum capacity of 5,000L to a maximum capacity of 5000L are permitted on a pier provided applicable spacing, secondary containment and piping requirements are met. (FC 4.5.6.6 & FC 4.3.7.)

 

n       The length of extended fuel dispensing hose at marine fuel dispensing stations is permitted to exceed the values which apply to other fuel dispensing stations (4.5m, or 6m). (FC 4.5.5.1.(4))

 

n       All hoses must be fitted with a breakaway valve when using a nozzle with a hold-open device. (FC 4.5.5.2.)

 

¨      Keep all fuel delivery hoses off the surface of the dock walkway.

 

¨      Use anti-surge valves in all the fuel vent lines.

 

¨      Use breakaway valves between all jump-hoses for dock-to-dock and dock-to-shore connections.

 

¨      Any delivery hose that has the potential to cause a spill, if it were pulled from the delivery pump or valve, should be fitted with a breakaway valve.

 

¨      A clearly marked sign outlining fuelling procedures should be visible to all operators including:

o        one person should stay with the fuel nozzle at all times during refueling

o        sorbent pads should be used to catch drips from the nozzle.

 

¨      Tanks should be marked at a level corresponding to 90% capacity, not filled beyond that level, and care should be taken so that:

o        fuel levels are checked prior to filling

o        valves are closed and the hose properly secured when refueling is finished

o        appropriate fuel caps are secured after refueling

o        portable fuel tanks are filled onshore.

 

¨      For docks and floating structures, safety measures should be taken, to account for wave action, tidal movement and windstorms, including one-way flow valves on solid lines from storage tanks to dispensers.
 

Pollution Prevention

n       All dock facilities must have spill response kits capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills on water. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       Suitably qualified personnel must prevent a boom boat from being overfilled by providing continuous supervision of the filling operations. (FC 4.3.1.8.)

 

¨      Sorbent pads should be used around the fill stem pipe to catch any drips from the nozzle while refueling.

 

¨      Standard industrial refueling equipment and parts should be used to ensure that the design meets industrial standards.

 

Emergency Response

n       A workplace must have a written emergency plan, appropriate to the hazards of the workplace that addresses the requirements of the OHSR 5.98 to 5.102.

 

n       Spills of TDG Class 3 – flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial Emergency Program (PEP) telephone 1-800-663-3456). (EMA, Spill Reporting Regulation – see definition of TDG Class 3 flammable liquids in Section 8. Glossary.)

 

n       Ensure that spills are recovered and that contamination is removed or treated. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       An employer is responsible for providing, at no cost to the worker, all personal protective equipment required to perform a job as outlined in the OHSR 8.2.2

 

n       Maintain a spill response kit capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills. (FC 4.1.6.3.)

 

n       Review fire safety plans annually. (FC 2.8.2.)

 

¨      Post spill response procedures in locations that are visible to all operators

 

¨      An emergency response plan should be implemented immediately following a spill.

 

¨      Use all available resources and technical expertise to ensure a quick and effective response.

 

¨      Maintain an adequate spill response kit capable of containing and absorbing fuel spills.

 

¨      An emergency shut-off system should be used to immediately close all valves between fuel storage units and dispensing units.

 

4.3              DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING

 

Inspection & Documentation

n       Visual inspections must be made daily and during each shift of the piping system, pumps and ancillary equipment for leaks, spills and obvious abnormal conditions. Any leakage must be repaired as quickly as practicable. (FC 4.4.11.5.)

 

n       A fuel-storage tank that is resting on the ground, such that visual inspection beneath the tank is not possible, must be measured daily (using tank dip measurements) and any gain or loss of liquid recorded. (FC 4.3.16.1.)

 

n       Spill response training should be conducted every two years (OHSR 5.102)

 

¨      The owner/operator should keep a record of all volumes before and after deliveries.

 

¨      Develop a checklist system to ensure all aspects of the facility are inspected and working as required.

 

Training and Signage

n       Post clearly legible operating instructions. (FC 4.5.8.4. & FC 4.5.8.8.)

 

n       Emergency instructions must be conspicuously posted. (FC 4.5.8.4.)

 

¨      Spill response training should be conducted every two years.

 

¨      A record of training scenarios and exercises should be kept on file.

 

 

Waste Management

¨      All waste petroleum products must be gathered in barrels or appropriate means of containment and disposed of by a qualified contractor.  Where possible, drums and pails of waste petroleum products should be stored in an area with appropriate secondary containment and protected from accumulation of rainfall.

 

n       If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79 (OHSR), ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is provided, if applicable. (OHSR 5.7)

 

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SECTION 5

INITIAL SPILL RESPONSE FOR COMBUSTIBLE PRODUCTS

(See Section 8. Glossary for FC and TDG definitions of flammable liquids and combustible liquids.)

The first response action provided here, is to be used in conjunction with annual spill response training.

 

PRIORITY RESPONSE ACTION

 

Act Fast & Think Safety

¨      Use Common Sense!

 

¨      Prior to taking any action, ensure that a complete assessment is made to ensure that resources are used effectively and that all risks are identified.

 

¨      Use appropriate safety procedures and personal protective equipment as issued by employer or within spill response kits.

 

¨      Never attempt to clean up a spill without notifying someone and alerting surrounding people

 

¨      An intense & quick response is essential to minimize the potential impact on the environment.

 

¨      Report all spills to supervisors regardless of quantity

 

 

Containment & Recovery Spill to Land

¨      Mark the perimeter of the spill.

 

¨      Dig recovery ditches around the perimeter (and pits within the spill area) to contain the spill.

 

¨      Monitor the ditches and pits to ensure the collection system are effective.

 

¨      Use sorbent pads, booms and pillows to remove free product and excavate the contaminated soil.

 

¨      Sample the soil to determine the extent of contamination.

 

¨      Pump the product from the containment area or obtain approval from BC MWLAP to burn the product.

 

n       All spills of fuel to land over 100 litres requires reporting to the Provincial Emergency Program,

 

 

Spill to Water

To effectively contain the spill, use several containment methods in series:

 

¨      In a ditch or stream, contain the spill using tarp containment system, underflow system or containment booms.  When using booms place the boom on a 45 degree angle from shore to shore or off the shore where possible

 

¨      In open water (i.e. lake) divert the spilled product to the containment system using sorbent booms, synthetic booms.

 

¨      Use sweeps to corral the spilled product to one corner. Add a second containment boom if required.

 

¨      Use sorbent pads and/or pumps to collect the spill products from the containment area.

 

¨      Use sweeps and sorbent pads to recover the product. Use a wringer to extract the excess product then reuse the sorbent pads.

 

¨      Use a skimmer or suction pump (i.e. pump truck) if the volume is significant and the spill is contained.

 

¨      Develop a monitoring program to assess and remove free product over a given time frame.

 

n       Any spill of fuel to a waterway (or that could eventually enter a waterway i.e. a ditch) must be reported to the Provincial Emergency Program and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans

 

 

Additional Information and Follow up

 

¨      Report to supervisor amount of materials used from spill kits (and their location and or number) so that they may be replaced quickly

 

¨      Fill out an incident report and ensure that all aspects of the cause(s) surrounding the spill are fully understood and or outlined.

 

¨      Ensure that measures are put in place to prevent such an incident from reoccurring.

 

¨      Take photos and notes to document the spill incident, response and clean-up.

 

¨      Ensure samples are taken and the results are properly documented and kept on file.

 

 

Waste Management

¨      Confirm disposal options and approval with BC MWLAP.

 

¨      All waste petroleum products must be gathered in barrels or appropriate means of containment and disposed of by a qualified contractor.  Where possible, drums and pails of waste petroleum products should be stored in an area with appropriate secondary containment and protected from accumulation of rainfall.

 

n       If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79 (OHSR), ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is provided, if applicable. (OHSR 5.7)


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SECTION 6

MINIMUM SPILL RESPONSE KIT REQUIREMENTS

 

1.1              PURPOSE

 

Spills of various sizes may occur at any time while operating within an active logging environment.  That is why it is important to have an appropriate sized spill response kit with all pieces of equipment.  Although the following minimum standards have been developed by the Coulson Group of Companies it is important to review the inherent risks of each project and ensure that the appropriate sized spill response kit (or materials) is available in the event of a spill.

 

1.2              MINIMUM SPILL RESPONSE KIT STANDARDS

 

 

LEVEL “A” SPILL RESPONSE KIT

(Additional Cleanup Equipment)

 

To Be Supplied by Burrard Clean Operations Limited

Quantity

Item

500'

Harbour Boom (10 lengths @ 50'x24")

1

Modular Disc/drum/brush skimmer c/w 100' hose

1

1,500 gallon Buoy Wall Tank or Port a Tank

1

Hatch Cone Transfer Device

2

3 HP Trash Pump (2" c/w hoses and connectors)

200

Hose (Oil-resistant c/w connectors)

8

Supplies and Cleanup Equipment for 8 Person Cleanup crew

 

 

LEVEL “B” SPILL RESPONSE KIT

For Placement at Fuel Transfer Areas

 

Quantity

Item

2

Coveralls (Tyvek or Saranex) XL and XXL

12

Sorbent Booms (Spills to water) 10' x 8"

6

Sorbent Socks (Hydrocarbon) (Spills to land and water) 10'x3"

1

Case sorbent pads 18"x18"x3/8" (white or gray)

10

Heavy Duty Garbage Bags

1

Shovel (non-sparking)

1

First Aid Kit #1

2 pair

Chemical Goggles - A/O (Fit Eyeglasses)

2 pair

Gloves (PVC Snorkel)

1

80-BC Rated Portable Fire Extinguisher

2

Safety Triangles, Cones

4

Life Jackets (at boom boat docks)

4

High visibility vests

2

No Smoking Signs

1

Roll of "Caution Do Not Enter" Tape

 

 

LEVEL “C” SPILL RESPONSE KIT

For Placement in Vehicles and Equipment

 

Quantity

Item

2

Coveralls (Tyvek or Saranex) XL and XXL

10

Fuel/Oil Sorbent Pads 18" x 18" x3/8" (white)

10

Anti-Freeze Sorbent Pads 18" x 18" x3/8" (gray/green)

2

10' sorbent booms or socks

5

Heavy Duty Garbage Bags

1

Shovel (non-sparking)

1

First Aid Kit #1

1

Chemical Goggles - A/O (Fit Eyeglasses)

2 pair

Gloves (PVC Snorkel)

1

10lb BC Type Fire Extinguisher

1

High visibility vests

 

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SECTION 7

FUEL TRANSFER - PUMPS

 

Hand operated pumps should be used only for transfer from drums. Electric driven units shall be listed for use with flammable or combustible liquids and are used frequently on tanks mounted on service vehicles.

 

Internal combustion engines used to drive pumps transferring flammable or combustible liquids have created some concerns in the last few years. However, NFPA 385 “Standard for Tank Vehicles for Flammable and Combustible Liquids” recognizes this practice and lays out some requirements where internal combustion engines are use to drive pumps.

 

1.         The engine air intake shall be equipped with an effective flame arrester, or an air cleaner having effective flame arrester characteristics, substantially installed and capable of preventing emission of flame from the intake side of the engine in the event of a backfire.

 

2.         The fuel system shall be so located or constructed as to minimize the fire hazard from spillage during filling and leakage from the tank or the fuel system.

 

3.         The engine shall be so located in relation to the pump that spillage from the pump shall be prevented from coming in contact with the engine or any part of the ignition and exhaust system. Adequate shielding can be provided to attain the same purpose.

 

4.         Where the engine is carried within an enclosed space, adequate provision shall be made for air circulation at all time to prevent accumulation of explosive vapours and avoid overheating of the engine.

 

5.         The exhaust system shall be substantially constructed and installed and free from leaks. The exhaust line and muffler shall have adequate clearance from combustible materials, and shall discharge at a location that will not constitute a hazard. When engines are carried within an enclosed space, the exhaust gases shall discharge outside of such enclosed space.

 

6.         The ignition wiring shall be substantially installed with firm connections. Spark plugs and other terminals shall be suitably insulated to prevent sparking in event of contact with conductive materials. The ignition switch shall be of the enclosed type.

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SECTION 8

GLOSSARY

 

aboveground storage

tank (AST)                                means a storage tank (capacity greater than 230 litres (L)) which is at least 90% above surface grade.

 

berm                                        means an impermeable system for containing leaks or spills. In tank farms containing a single tank, it must be of sufficient size to contain the volume of the tank plus 10%. For a multi-tank farm facility the berm must contain 110% of the largest tank or 100% of the largest tank plus 10% of the aggregate volume of all the tanks within the berm, which ever is greater. The berm can be constructed of steel, concrete, or soil in combination with a geotextile liner that is compatible with and impermeable to the stored liquid.

 

biocel                                       means a bermed and lined area used for application of biological methods for treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

 

breakaway valve                       means valves used on fuel hoses to prevent spills from hose and valve connectors. The typical breaking point is 300 lbs. (136 kg). These valves are usually located on either end of the fuel dispensing hose.

 

combustible liquids                  (See flammable liquids below – this glossary)

 

CGSB 43.146                            refers to the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) standard for “Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBC) for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods” and the United Nations (UN) requirements for IBC’s. The requirements for certification include material type, construction and pressure relief requirements, design type, tests, and quality assurance.

 

CSA B620-87                            means the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Preliminary Standard B620-1987 Highway Tanks and Portable Tanks for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods. This standard outlines the requirements for certification including: material thickness, weld thickness, material alloy and properties, structural integrity, circumferential reinforcement, rollover protection, rear bumpers, emergency flow control and piping protection, vents and, closure for manholes.

 

CSA B620-98                            means the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Preliminary Standard B620-98 Highway Tanks and Portable Tanks for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods. This second edition of the CSA Standard B620 is expected to replace and supersede (in 2001) Preliminary Standard B620 published in 1987 under the proposed regulation.

 

dunnage                                   means loose material used around a cargo to prevent damage.

 

drum                                        means a barrel having a capacity of less than 230L (50 imperial gallons) but greater than 23 litres (5 imperial gallons).

 

environmental

management system

(EMS)                                       means a system including “organizational structure, responsibility, practices, procedures, processes, and resources for developing, implementing achieving, reviewing, and maintaining the environmental policy” - (ISO 14001)

 

fire extinguisher includes:         a 10-B:C rated portable fire extinguisher (weighing approximately 5lbs. depending on manufacturer); a 20-B:C rated portable fire extinguisher weighing approximately 10lbs. depending on manufacturer).

 

Fire Code (FC)                          Means the British Columbia Fire Code, 1998.

 

fixed location                           means any location that is used to store a fuel tank (or container), regardless of the length of time it is being stored.

 

flammable liquids

combustible liquids                  In the B.C. FC (and National Fire Code – NFC), liquids with a flash point below 37.8 °C are referred to as flammable liquids, whereas liquids with a flash point at or above 37.8 °C are referred to as combustible liquids. In contrast, TDG Regulations classifies flammable liquids as Class 3 Dangerous Goods, and defines them as liquids having a flash point below 61 °C.

Comparison of FC and

TDG classifications based

on flash point (FC A-4.1.2.1.)    Flash point °C NFC Classification        TDG Classification

                                                below –18                                           IA                                 3.1

                                                at or above –18 & below 22.8               IA                                 3.2

                                                below 22.8 (equivalent to 23 in TDG)     IB                                 3.2

                                                at or above 22.8 & below 37.8              IC                                 3.3

                                                at or above 37.8 & below 60

                                                (equivalent to 61 in TDG)                      II                                   3.3

                                                at or above 60 & below 93.3                 IIIA                                Not Regulated

                                                at or above 93.3                                  Not Regulated                Not Regulated

 

flash point                                means the lowest temperature at which a liquid or solid (e.g., petroleum product) gives off vapour of sufficient concentration to form an ignitable mixture in air as determined by a closed cup test describe in Part I of Schedule IV of the TDG Regulations.

 

 

fuel cache                                means a temporary storage (e.g. seasonal) of drums at a remote location.

 

fuel dispensing (or

service) station                         means any fuel facility (operating on marine or fresh waters) including service stations, self-service outlets or tank farms at isolated industrial projects at which flammable liquids or combustible liquids are dispensed from fixed equipment into the fuel tank of a vehicle, watercraft, or other equipment.

 

fuel facility                               means any location (may include a remote fuel cache) at which flammable liquids or combustible liquids are dispensed from a tank vehicle or fixed storage tank into the fuel tank of a motor vehicle, equipment or watercraft.

 

hatch-cone kit                          is a funnel-shaped bag used to off-load fuel from the hatch of a rolled over fuel truck. The wide end of the funnel is fitted with a wire clamp that can be secured under the lip of the dome. The small end of the funnel is fitted with a cam-lock fitting for a hose connection.

 

hydrocarbon fuels                    means flammable or combustible petroleum products including but not limited to, gasoline, diesel, aviation gasoline, jet fuel A (kerosene), jet fuel B (naphtha).

 

marine fuel

dispensing (or

service) station                         See fuel dispensing station above – this glossary.

 

overfill protection includes:       prevention of tanks from being overfilled by providing continuous supervision of the filling operation by personnel qualified to supervise such an operation; or, an overfill protection devise conforming to ULC/ORD-C58.15, “Overfill Protection Devices for Flammable Liquid Storage Tanks.” Examples include float valve shut off devices, audible or visible overfill alarm systems, automatic sensing and shut-off devices and vent restriction devices.

 

Occupational Health &

Safety Regulation:                   The OHS Regulation contains legal requirements that must be met by all workplaces under the inspectional jurisdiction of the WCB. This includes most workplaces in B.C., except mines and federally chartered workplaces such as banks, inter-provincial and international transportation, telephone systems, and radio, television, and cable services.


The purpose of the OHS Regulation is to promote occupational health and safety and to protect workers and other persons present at workplaces from work-related risks to their health, safety, and well-being. Compliance with the requirements provides the basis on which workers and employers, in cooperation, can solve workplace health and safety problems. The requirements provide a foundation upon which to build an effective health and safety program.

 

petroleum products                  includes pure hydrocarbon products or mixtures of hydrocarbons, which have been refined from crude oil, with or without additives, that is used as a fuel or lubricant. Such products include gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation fuel, kerosene, naphtha, lubricating oil, fuel oil, hydraulic oil and engine oil (including used oil) and exclude propane, paint, and solvents.

 

portable tank                            means a closed container that is designed to be movable while containing liquid, which is equipped with skids, mountings or accessories to facilitate handling of the tank by mechanical means, and is not permanently attached to a transport vehicle.

 

Purged                                     means a tank from which all vapours have been properly removed by forced air venting or by a non-combustible gas (CO2 or Nitrogen).

 

riparian zones or

areas                                       mean those terrestrial areas where vegetation complexes and microclimate conditions are products of the combined presence and influence of perennial and/or intermittent water, associated high water tables, and soils that exhibit some wetness characteristics. The terms have traditionally been used in reference to zones within which plants grow rooted in the water table of rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, reservoirs, springs, marshes, seeps, bogs and wet meadows. The riparian zone is influenced by and exerts an influence on the associated aquatic ecosystem.

 

 

RSBC                                       means Revised Statutes of British Columbia

 

secondary

containment                             means structures used for spill control such as:

                                                (a) a double walled container (or tank within a tank design);

                                                (b) a steel or concrete container (tank within a box design) capable of containing 110% of the volume being stored (should be manufactured to a ULC specification);

                                                (c) an earth or clay dike which is lined with an impermeable geomembrane material and is capable of containing 110% of the volume being stored; or,

                                                (d) a site which is graded or sloped to divert a spill into a collection system where it will not impact public health, safety or the environment. The containment should be lined with a geomembrane to prevent contaminating the subsurface soil layer.
 

small container

small TDG tank                       Small container means a container with a capacity of less than 230L, including canisters, jerry cans, pails and drums, that is covered by the Fire Code. Small TDG tank means a container with a capacity less than 450L, that is covered by the TDG Regulation. Small TDG tanks can be recognized by ULC or CSA label or logo.

 

specified tank                          means a tank that was designed and manufactured to recognized engineering standards, in contrast to a “non-specified tank” which does not meet recognized engineering standards.

 

spill control                            means site selection and storm water management practices and techniques to prevent spills from entering natural waterways. It may include techniques and structures for diverting or containing spills and preventing them from entering storm drains and sanitary sewers, and may include grading the site, and using double walled tanks and tank-in-a-box systems.

 

storage tank                             means a vessel for flammable or combustible liquids having a capacity greater than 230L, and designed to be installed in a fixed location. (FC 1.2.1)

 

tank farm                                 means any facility where bulk petroleum products/ hydrocarbon fuels are stored in storage tank(s).

 

tank vehicle                            means any vehicle, other than railroad tank cars and boats, with a cargo tank having a capacity greater than 450L, mounted or built as an integral part of the vehicle and used for the transportation of flammable liquids or combustible liquids and including tank trucks, trailers and semi-trailers. (FC 1.2.1)

 

Transportation of

Dangerous Goods

(TDG)                                       means the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act Clear Language Regulations, a comprehensive Canadian statute to promote public safety in the transportation of dangerous goods.

 

truck-box fuel tank

(includes slip tank

or Tidy tank)                            means a portable container used for transportation of fuels on a truck. The capacity may vary depending on the type of tank (see Section 2.1. Design.).

Underwriters

Laboratory of

Canada (ULC)                        means the Underwriters Laboratory of Canada, a non-profit organization that maintains and operates laboratories, certification services and a quality system registration program for the examination, testing and classification of devices, construction, materials and systems to determine their relation to life, fire and property hazards.

 

ULC/ORD-C 142.13

– 1997                                      means to the Underwriters’ Laboratories of Canada /Other Recognized Document requirements for steel tanks that are to be used for the limited transportation of flammable and combustible liquids employed in the servicing of off-road equipment. This document outlines the fabrication, inspection and testing for leakage before shipment from the factory as complete assemblies. These requirements cover tanks having a maximum capacity of 5,000L or single wall tanks and tanks with secondary containment either as double-wall vacuum monitored or contained tanks. These supply tanks are intended for off road use in forest management and construction or other areas where permitted by the authority having jurisdiction. Tanks manufactured before 2003 are acceptable to Transport Canada and may be used until 2010.

 

UN 31A/UN 31B                      means the United Nations specification for acceptable intermediate bulk containers (IBC) for the transportation of dangerous goods (as per the TDG Regulation), that outlines the acceptable requirements for transporting flammable liquids and combustible liquids on all public roads. This specification will be the only recognized specification after 2010.

 

 

Bullets:

 

n       Statutory Requirements

·          

¨      Recommended Practices

o         

 

Symbols:

 

less than (<)

greater than (>)

equal to or less than (=)

equal to or greater than ()

 

 

Abbreviations:

 

meter (m)

litre (L)

kilogram (Kg)

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